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20121027
20121104
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and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a couple of the reports i have on this. from 2002 from the former executive director from dits, which is the predecessor agency to the department of technology and proposal for management and resources. then go a couple years later the civil grand jury report looked at our technology with hospital "pot holes or possibilities" and a year later the city controller had a letter and said they needed to improve service and performance measures. after that our city analyst did a management audit into their practices and two years later a another analyst looking
city's administrative code that attempt to introduce positive improvements to the way technology is practiced around here. today we ask you as members of the board of supervisors if you're satisfied with the implementation of those changes you made to the role of city cio and the five year plan? are you satisfied that these changes are moving technology sufficiently forward within city government? if you are then things will stay the same around here. the office of the mayor accuses the civil grand jury of not knowing much about technology in the city. yes, we start friday scratch but we spent a year learning directly from the leaders within city government within technology units throughout the city. we had some help since two of our five member investigation team are seasoned technology professionals. we interviewed more than 40 employees and elected officials, quite a few several times. we believed there was a good deal of candor in those interviews. not as much in the responses we're sorry to say. we did a great deal and discuss what we found with people in city gov
. this one regarding the technology system is quite extensive. i want to thank the civil grand jury for putting our paces with this one and we will have some dialogue and we might have questions along the way and with that president chiu do you want to take charge here? >> sure. first of all i wanted to note it's interesting no one wanted to speak in public comment on this item. i know there have been folks focused on these questions for a long time and probably city staffers watching this hearing not sharing their shoats and i am looking and the policy makers are looking to have an open dialogue with these moatings and what i find in coit meetings everyone agrees and projects take 15 years and millions of dollars over budget to get done and i am getting frankly frustrated and tired about that, so i encourage city staffers and others who have an opinion on this and feel free to raise them in coit meetings or contact my office and i am willing to have more private conversations and i think having an open dialogue how we strengthen our operations. how we can work better with the de
done at department of technology and tough economic times and the fact of the matter is your department has been subjected to the lion's share of budget cuts we were forced to do and not asking departments to make similar cuts in their it situation and i think that is part of the tension and why we shouldn't know been able to make headway. you allude to the fact until you get direction from the top about need of centralization you had to form partnerships and you as the head of department of technology can't tell other heads to cooperate and you have to work out and partnership. one of the things that i wished the grand jury spent more time on. this is the trend we're seeing in agencies and governments around the country. by in large most governments have a growing decentralization and we know we're not doing that for everything but there are functions that need to be decentralized and we know there are successes here in california and the state is expected to save $3 billion. denver went through a great consolidation and saving millions of dollars. what are those entities doing that
the right useful data. everyone agrees that hiring for technology needs to be improved. technology is a highly dynamic and ever changing field. no one can predict the five years of technology or what talent will be required. of your cell phone. the administrator requires a staffing plan. doesn't exist. there maybe hurdles to overcome but hiring as permanent exempt is better than the traditional civil service for technology. it reduces time to hire. it raises proakt of attracting top talent. it means hiring mistakes can be corrected easily. it's done elsewhere in the city. lawyers and our attorney departments do have at will status for the same reasons as we find with technology. isn't it worth the effort to match talent with what is needed? culture is a mighty force. it provides comfort in it's traditions. it's a safe haven u because it's tried and accepted. it's reinforced because it's troublesome to change but culture all blinds to the other ways of doing things evening if the other ways hint of doing better. it stifles and shuts down i thinking. it doesn't anticipa
down to partnerships and i think department of technology and cio and coit we spend time creating these partnerships and the consolidation project is a great one. i also want to acknowledge the airport and the emergency management center and we have a great partnership with. we have a great partnership with labor and reclassify it positions and training program whereas in the past it was done on a department by department basis so i think we're creating those partnerships for success, but i think at the end of the day it's a transitional challenge for the organization to go from thinking of itself as minicorporations as they view themselves at times in independent departments to work together as a cohesive unit. it just grew up. we started in the main frame days and monolithic and those terminals and pc revolution game and it was different overnight and everyone had a pc and the expert on how to work things so we are looking for a balance. we are bringing your own device to work and still balance that and what does it make sense to have centralized and do from a security confi
management audit evaluating department of technology's function and dt adequately communicates with other departments and alleviate their barriers to performance and i gather from other agencies this will be implemented and while the audit will be helpful it is my understanding this is under way. recommendation number four -- >> excuse me. through the chair, president chiu, i think in terms what is required for responses to the recommendations there are four categories of responses. either has been implemented, has not been implemented but will be implemented. for that we need a time frame for the implementation of the recommendation requires further analysis, that requires description of the scope and time frame not exceeding six months and lastly -- [inaudible] >> my understanding is this will be implemented but the six month time frame is appropriate if that is something we're required to do. >> okay. so for will be implemented -- yes. as long as there is a time frame. >> okay. i will use that as a default, for time period for coit and department of technology to work with this
and department of technology to work with this on the budget analyst or controller. for finding four and appoint two members without delay. from my understanding will be implemented and while the city has not moved on it for six months i expect this to be. >> >> six years i expect the city to work on this and get it done in the next six months or six weeks. next is have a plan and budget and reviewed by coit and to the mayor's office and the board of supervisors. again what is fascinating about the answers and all of the agencies are across the map. some say yes. some say no. some say it's implemented. some say it's not. it will be implemented and always a cit budget but not decisions related to that budget. recommendation number six. subject to coit approval of the i kr.d t budget and staffing plans coit and the cio must monitor adherence to these plans and i think what i will say for this should be implemented within the next six months. one of the challenges we face challenges here at the board and coit and time lines and budgets keep slipping and it's important to have monitoring
the administrative code to separate the position of the city cio from the department much technology. we are in the process of occupying up. >> >> mr. walton has been acting as the cio for one year now? two years now which has been a problem and i would have find if we made the acting cio, the cio and that's the mayor's opinion and i think the answer to this is requires further anal scpises require whether the two positions are needed after the new cio is hired and similarly for recommendation number ten which is to amend the administrative code to create separate position of the director of dt pointed to -- appointed by and to the city's cio and same analysis after the new cio is hired. that is in the first phase and now let's go to the second and my apologies for speaking quickly. although address although these bodies address technology on a city wide basis technology is not treated as a distinct organizational entity and i agree. i think it should be treated as a city wide and departmental function and hr function, or the controller's function. some functions need to be centrali
and technology within san francisco government. perhaps we have to wait for a different administration for there to be a fair hearing on ways to improve technology. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can take up this challenge. we hope you will. there was a better ending to our title report, deja vu all over again. that is "where there is a will there is a way .". thank you. >> thank you for the time and effort put into that report. any questions right now president chiu. all right. with that i would like to ask the mayor's office to come up. cindy is here representing the mayor's team with some responses and perhaps follow up questions. >> good afternoon supervisors. i am cindy, deputy director of the marrow's budget office and here to speak to the reports. i am going to keep my response fairly brief and will answer any questions you have in the hearing. as you know ie.d t and innovation are among the mayor's top priority and shares in the task force and focusing on government efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness through innovation and it. since he's been in office he
you cindy for the presentation and for the department of technology john. john, how are you? we have john from the department of technology and wanted to speak as well and welcome. >> thank you supervisors and thank you civil grand jury for your report and everyone attending. i want to take a few moments. i don't want to rehash the stuff said and commented on and you probably want a rich dialogue in question and answer period. i want to visit a few of points and give context to the conversation and like you i am fascinated by the title of the report and we should revisit a little bit and after being here for five years now where we have been and where we are coming to. in terms of deja vu let's reflect back where we were as individuals with technology or as an organization with the city. when i joined the city we didn't have a plan or a governance structure or coit and sun shet and talking about creating this structure and we were struggling how much money were we spending on it in the city? when i came here there wasn't a report? and so it has been a long and complex journey,
to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk
is that the mayor provide consistent passionate and aggressive leadership in the field of city wide technology fostering progress and garnderring agreement moon departments and cooperative and cohesive culture. the mayor has stated that has been implemented. i would like to say i hope that is implemented on in the next six months and demand accountability for budgets and deadlines and more cohesive culture and the sharing of work, so with that mr. chair you're going to do the findings and recommendations for the next one, but the only thing i would just like to say in conclusion is i know that this is a topic that touches a lot of nerves. there are a lot of folks working hard within individual departments, within department of technology and within the mayor's office to move us in a good direction and one thing i would like to state the recommendations i am recommending is no way pointing specific fingers anywhere, but i think that we have to have honest and real dialogue about what we need to do to move things forward and i have to tell you i hope this is the last time the civil grand jury
technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is give a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this 32,000 in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions prizes awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk m
there . >> item 8d, update on other technology projects. >> hermine canto, technology department of the department of building inspection. email delivery is almost complete, we should have that shortly. we have about 40 percent of dr requests coming through the web right now. on the cache management system, the good news is the tax director is scheduled to go live in november, which means we will follow within a few weeks after that. this is scheduled for the last week of november for the tax collector. we did receive the hardware, the cash drawers on the units, so they are going to be installed shortly and then the training is scheduled for sometime in december. on the tablet pc's, we deployed a few tablets for the field inspectors, we did receive feedback for the service provider. we are gathering feedback and will be presenting optionsto make it better and possibly even a better service provider option to our director and deputy director in the next week, i would think. on the southern project, it's going fine. actually, we had a site survey from the contractor team and the architecture d
out what i think is happening with great organizations like sf city and our technology companies, that we want to embrace technology as a way to announce this. so with that i am going to do the first tweet. tweeting. the new hash tag we would like everybody in the bay area to also utilize in their effort to go viral on this. there it goes. hopefully it goes on there. the hash tag sf super bowl! [applause] >> this is one example. facebook, google plus, instagram. we have all these wires in having people talk to us. what would they want and establish it, what kind of events that will help us be even more philanthropic about this. san francisco, santa clara, san jose, we want that effort to insight people to take this opportunity to join our nfl, join our 49ers, to join all of our sports crazy efforts and education efforts and all the things that we really reflect success in the san francisco bay area to join us in promoting this event and making sure that when we are ready to submit our bid to the nfl in may of next year that we will have created a community-based bay area wide eff
to fully implement technological improvements. muni says -- they give us a list -- muni gave us a list of improvements that are under way. they say these will reduce the need for switchbacks. the jury answers, "the jury appreciates the efforts being made. we are glad some of these are partially accomplished and others coming in the future. many systems we interviewed had these technologys in place. we would like muni to have a sense of urgency about the improvements and concerned about the term "under way" and completion dates that are years away" . on f8 which concerns a new control center lacking adequate operating personnel and f9 muni has failed to conduct and publish rider survey and muni agreed with both of these findings. as far as the recommendations, the first recommendation is to eliminate switchbacks except when unavoidable. muni disagrees with the recommendation reasserting that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safet
there are concerns about safety, safety of the vehicle. there are a lot of things we do in technology to ensure the vehicles can't be stolen if they are broken into. but i really do see that members of these communities also see some of the benefits that these cars bring to them. they kind of watch out. it's almost like the neighborhood watch thing. this car is here, it's serving a purpose. i'm a member, i use it day to day. the car has really become part of the neighborhood. >> um-hm, okay. thank you very much. >>> sure. >>> i did want to say i'm looking at the material. thank you for putting this together. it looks like there are five u.s. cities, three canadian cities, and i think it's brilliant, this model of one-way vehicle * . i was going to ask about your vehicle fleet. it looks like you have globally 5,000 vehicles, 625 are electric. i'm just wondering do you use the smart cars or what kind of vehicles do you use? and i also see that san francisco, based on your market research, is almost like a perfect city to operate in given the density and many, many people that don't have cars. but
of technology and our city administrator. but ultimately working with our department of public works and mohammed at the helm, making sure this got done on time within budget, having the architects and engineers under [speaker not understood] working with the expert laboratory folks from dph and the hiv clinic to make sure that we did it right. because the laboratories have to meet federal standards. but i think also a great kudos has to happen to our partners, both locally, regionally, and the federal government. we could not have done this without the 9-1/2 million dollars of recovery monies that we got through the federal government. we have herb schultz here from the department of human services federal government. they've been really at the forefront with us. certainly dan bernel representing leader pelosi. she has been really a stalwart fighter. when everybody was cutting funds, she preserved that money for us. and, of course, i've got to put out a big, big thanks to president obama because without that recovery money, we wouldn't be here talking about this today. so, thank you
for the public if they would like to pick up copies of it. and we hope that the technology supports us. >> so commissioners this is, as for the last three years we have been in a process of rethinking general education transportation services. and we are in the presentation tonight, going to share what our budget reduction goals are for the 2013-14 school year. and go over what the approach for developing recommendations for year 3 of changes, and then going into a description of what those recommendations are. the impact of the changes, and an overview of the next steps and the description of some alternatives to yellow bus transportation. in the appendix, just for context, this is an overview of the board's policy guidelines and an overview of the general education transportation services currently available and a summary of the changes that have taken place over the last two years. so i will start with the budget reduction goal. as you know, we are trying to minimize the use of general fund contributions for general education transportation. and so, we need to reduce the fleet by 5 buss fr
technology disabilities project, and a strong advocate and partner with my office on how we as a city provide culturally competent and linguistickly [speaker not understood] to under served communities. she has so many awards, i'm beingv going to read them all. her most important role is she is the head director of the chinatown child development center, a children's mental health clinic of the san francisco department of public health, one out of the community behavioral health services division. nancy, i want to thank you for taking care of our kids, taking care of our parents unction taking care of our families, chinatown and our chinese community and just being part of the amazing fabric that is our mental health community here in san francisco. congratulations. (applause) >>> supervisor chiu, thank you so much for this honor. thank you, board of supervisors also. i wanted to say that our chinatown child development center just celebrated our 40th anniversary and thank you for being there. and also, you know, before our agency formed with greater, there was only one chinese child receivin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)